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How to wire a Point Motor

There are many different types of Point Motors available for your Model Railway Layout. The first type are in fact Twin Coil Motor, the next is a Stall Motor, then the reverse Polarity Motor, the fourth one is a Reverse Polarity Coil Motor, and the final one is a Servo Motor.
Twin Coil DC
Let’s look at the Twin Coil Motor, these come in many different shapes and sizes, for above and below baseboard mounting. Some have auxiliary switches built in other have the facility to have auxiliary switches fitted to them. The basic principle is you switch on one coil to move the actuator bar one way, and then switch on the other coil to move the actuator bar the other way.
 
The wiring of this type of motor is as follows.The Negative is common to both coils and is shown in Green from the Power supply. The positive from the power supply goes to the centre terminal on a Momentary (centre biased) Toggle switch. (Salecom T8014A-SEBQ-H). One side of the switch (Black) goes to one coil, and the other side of the switch (Red) goes to the other coil. When the switch is pushed left the red coil is energised, pulling the actuator bar towards Solenoid 1. When the switch is pushed to the right the black coil is energised, pulling the actuator bar towards Solenoid 2.
                                     Hornby R8243                                                                             Gaugemaster Seep Motor
Stall Motor DC
Tortoise Motors sometimes called Stall Motors or Slow Motion Motors work with a permanent current to the motor coils, so when it reaches its limit it simple stalls and remains there until the polarity is reversed, changing the direction of the motor.
The Power supply can be very basic 9v to 12v unfiltered. The polarity is changed by the Double Pole Double Throw (DPDT)Switch, (Salecom T8011-SEBQ-H), the switch could also be a DPDT Slide Switch. The toggle switch has a Keyway on one side of the shaft, position this as the drawing before you start soldering wires to it. (A keyway is a groove in the shaft). Connection to the Tortoise Motor is via Terminals 8 and 1. The wires can be soldered to the printed circuit board, there are also push on terminal blocks available for this.

Wiring is as follows. Positive from the power source goes to pins 3 & 4 on the Switch. Negative goes to 6 & 1. Pin 2 Goes to Terminal 8 on the motor, & Pin 5 goes to Terminal 1. Terminal 2 to 7 are two separate Change-over contacts activated by the motor. These can be used for panel indications, signals, etc. They can be used to drive LED’s directly without the use of dropping resistors.
Stall Motor DCC
The following drawing shows the connection to a DCC System
Cobalt Omega Motor DC
Cobalt Omega Motors sometimes called Stall Motors work with a permanent current to the motor coils, so when it reaches its limit it simple stalls and remains there until the polarity is reversed, changing the direction of the motor. The Power supply can be 9v to 12v or 12v to 18v by using the miniature switch to the right of the terminal block. The polarity is changed by the Double Pole Double Throw (DPDT)Switch, (Salecom T8011-SEBQ-H), the switch could also be a DPDT Slide Switch. The toggle switch has a Keyway on one side of the shaft, position this as the drawing before you start soldering wires to it. (A keyway is a groove in the shaft). Connection to the Cobalt Omega Motor is via Terminals 1 and 2. The wires should be 16/0.2mm and are push fit into the spring terminals.

Wiring is as follows. Positive from the power source goes to pins 3 & 4 on the Toggle Switch. Negative goes to 6 & 1. Pin 2 Goes to Terminal 1 on the motor, & Pin 5 goes to Terminal 2. Terminal 3 can be used to wire LED’s or Signals.

Terminal 4 – Left rail    Terminal 5 – Right Rail    Terminal 6 – Common    Terminal 7 – Common    Terminal 8 – Left
Terminal 9 – Right
Cobalt Omega Motor DCC
The following drawing shows the connection to a DCC System
More to come